Winter Term 2016-12-14T05:15:49-05:00

Winter Term Course Offerings 2017

Winter Term is a chance for both teachers and students to explore areas of interest that do not appear as courses in the standard curriculum. Drawing from personal backgrounds and fields of study, teachers prepare courses to enhance the standard Catholic Central curriculum. Winter Term is held in January.

Attendance during Winter Term: As Winter Terms compacts a semester of coursework into four weeks, attendance is very important. It is good to consider each day as if it were three days, as each course meets for three hours a day. Adjusting the standard attendance policy to correspond, missing multiple days during Winter Term puts credit for the course in jeopardy. As stated in the Student Handbook: “A student should not have more than two absences during Winter Term.” Please make every effort not to miss a day during Winter Term.

Below is a list of courses offered during the 2017 Winter Term. Note the credit value as well as the meeting time. Students must choose one course for the morning session and one for the afternoon session.

 

Note: All freshmen are automatically registered for the afternoon health course.

 

Course Title Credits Grade Levels Preferred Enrollment Time Offered


MORNING COURSES

Yellow Springs Water Testing 0.5 Science 10-12 15-20 Morning

 

In conjunction with Wright State University and its Yellow Springs Water testing research, students will develop an understanding of the chemical nature of air, water, and soil. Students will also select appropriate methods for sampling and analyzing environmental samples in Yellow Springs. In addition, students will interpret the physical and chemical properties of a substance to predict its fate and predict how chemicals degrade and move in the environment. Finally, students will tour the waste water treatment facility and present their findings at the end of January to the community of Yellow Springs.

*In order to take this class, you must be currently enrolled in chemistry with a B- or higher or have completed chemistry.

Service Ministry 0.5 Religion 9-12 15-20 Morning

 


If you are interested in enrolling in this course, you must get an application from Mrs. Roth or Ms. Lindsey and complete it as soon as possible.

What does it mean to be a Christian disciple? How will you answer this question, and how will you respond to this question in your life?  In Service Ministry class, you will spend time in discussion, reflection, prayer, and activities designed to strengthen you in living out your Christian faith. You will spend two days each week serving in the community with local schools and ministries, and you will make preparations to lead Catholic Central Service Day in the spring. Through this class, you can make a difference in your school, your community, and your own spirituality.

Robotics 0.5 Science 9-12 16 Morning

 

Students will design and build robots that will perform a variety of tasks. They will learn to use various sensors (light, color, pressure, and ultrasonic) to provide feedback that allows their robot to respond to various situations. They will learn to follow logical thought processes to program their robots. They will learn to use mathematics to adjust distance, speed, turning radius, and other variables. They will be exposed to various concepts of mechanical engineering, such as the operation of gears, pulleys, levers, and feedback systems. This class can accommodate sixteen students with eight “design teams” of two students each. Students’ grades will be determined through a combination of team grades based upon the design and performance of their robots as well as individual grades based upon knowledge gained in design, programming, the operation of sensors, and the use of math in controlling the robot.

Advanced Robotics 0.5 Science 10-12 8 Morning

This course is limited to students who have already taken Robotics. Students will work with more advanced robotic kits to build robots that will accomplish more advanced tasks. Some tasks will be designed by the teacher, some will be designed by the students, and some will be determined by this year’s National Robotics Competition goals. The class will be limited to 8 students who will work in teams of two. Students’ grades will be determined through a combination of team grades, based upon knowledge gained in design, programming, the operation of sensors, and the use of math in controlling the robot.

The World at War 0.5 Social Studies 9-12 15-20 Morning

 

Modern historians believe that World War I and World War II are more correctly viewed as one war separated by a twenty year truce.  This course will investigate the causes, battles and results of the two wars, as well as looking at how the wars impacted the people “back home.”  We will look at important people, both politicians and others, who impacted the course of the wars, both on the battlefield and politically. Finally, we will investigate the lasting effect of the wars on our world today. Coursework will involve reading, especially of primary sources, lecture, the use of documentaries and films, and student research and class presentations.

 

Printmaking at the Springfield Art Museum 0.5 Fine Arts 10-12 15-20 Morning

 

This course is co-taught between the Springfield Museum of Art and Catholic Central HS. Through exploration of shared concepts it combines English language arts with artmaking and interaction with and examination of works of art.  Students will write responses to the works on display at the museum, create individual and collaborative works of art, take part in the museum exhibition process, and present their work orally and visually at a culminating art opening. This year students will learn about and produce art work that is inspired by the work of the Dayton Printmaker’s Cooperative. Through their work with the exhibition, students will not only make their own pieces but learn about the social and historical implications of printmaking technology on the world and on art.

Magnified Giving 0.5 Religion 9-12 10-15 Morning

If you’ve ever wondered what the greatest needs in our community really are . . .

If you’ve ever thought that philanthropy is only for rich people . . .

If you’ve ever wanted to give but didn’t know where . . .

If you’ve ever wanted to help but didn’t know how . . .

Magnified Giving might be for you.

In this course, students will research how local social agencies are working to meet the community’s needs and then choose an agency to be awarded a $1,000 grant (or more, based on class fundraising). We seek to answer the following questions: What are the needs of our community? How does our faith call us to respond? Research will include in-class work, on-site agency visits, and volunteer service. This is a student-driven course; students must be highly-motivated and interested in local issues and social action. Students will also develop their skills in persuasive presentations and professional communication.

Magnified Giving II 0.5 Religion 10-12 10-15 Morning

Were you energized by your experience in Magnified Giving last year? Would you like to build on previous learning, take on more leadership, and continue to investigate how faith and social issues interact? In Magnified Giving II, students will work with teachers, community leaders, and first year Magnified Giving students to become more engaged and educated philanthropists. The course will include site visits, volunteer service, organizing fundraisers, making presentations, and student decision making. Following the student-led approach to Magnified Giving, these second year students will help define and design course expectations and procedures.

Culture and Crafts Among the Continents 0.5 Fine Arts 9-12 15-20 Morning

 

This course will feed the cultural senses. The class will explore various foods, art projects, and wonderful books as you learn about different cultures on several different continents. Each country that we discuss will include a literature discussion and excerpt readings from exciting books. Then we will complete meaningful art projects from that specific country.  Finally, we will have the opportunity to enjoy culturally-relevant foods from that particular country.  The class will focus on cultures from Mexico, Rwanda, Australia, China, and the Amazon.

Photography 0.5 Fine Arts 9-12 10-15 Morning

In this class students will learn the fundamentals of photography from camera exposure and composition to styles of photography and photo editing. Students will learn inside the class with hands on lessons and outside the class with opportunities to test your skills in different environments. Students will apply their learning and skills to photography projects that relate to different types of photography such as nature, portraiture, fashion, and documentary.

CCHS has 8 school cameras that students may use  for this class. If there are more than 8 students who sign up, additional students will have to bring their own camera. Camera specifications are as follows: The camera must be a Cannon T4i, T5i, or T6i, and any Nikon cameras must be approved by Mrs. Nickerson.

Independent Study/Internship 0.5 or 1.0 10-12 No Limit Whole or Half Day


*In order to complete an internship as a sophomore, you must have a 3.75 cumulative GPA. There is no GPA requirement for juniors and seniors.*

Winter Term internships are designed to help you explore career options, connect to academic work, and/or pursue a deep personal interest. Students can register for full or half-day internships. Eligible sophomores, juniors, and seniors are encouraged to take this opportunity to explore career fields of interest, gaining an understanding of the demands, educational needs, and daily routine of a career. The experience will help the student narrow career choices. Students also take this time to work on comprehensive research projects. See Dr. Kregel for details. All paperwork for independent studies/internships is due Friday, November 11.

AFTERNOON COURSES

Health 0.5 Health All Freshmen All Freshmen Afternoon

Health is a required course for all freshmen to complete. The course is divided into the following sections: Nutrition, Mental Health, Sexual Health, and Drug and Alcohol Abuse. Each section examines what it means to live a healthy lifestyle and provides suggestions or techniques for doing so. Students will analyze how our diet, stress levels, promiscuity, and the use of drugs impact out health. A variety of methods are used to assess each student’s comprehension during the course.

Sign Language II 0.5 Foreign Language 10-12 10-15 Afternoon

In this class students will increase their ability to read and use finger spelling through the use of games and other interactive activities. Students will also learn the importance of facial expression while signing. In addition, students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of the deaf culture. Finally, students will learn how they can help a hard of hearing or deaf individual during an emergency situation such as a car accident or an evacuation.

*In order to take this class, you must have completed Sign Language I last year during Winter Term (or at a different time)

Forensics 0.5 Science 10-12 10-15 Afternoon

In the Forensic Science course, we will focus on multiple branches of forensics.  Introduction to crime scene basics and evidence collection will start off the course.  Students will learn how to analyze fingerprints and blood spatter.  They will begin to learn handwriting analysis basics and how to perform basic ink chromatography.  Analysis of physical trace evidence such as fibers and hairs will be included as well.  Forensic psychology will be introduced, which is the study of abnormal psychology and how the mind plays a factor in criminal behavior.  By the end of the course students should be able to evaluate mock crime scenes and solve the crime.

Engineering Your Future 0.5 Science 10-12 10-15 Afternoon

Explore engineering through hands-on and computer-assisted design, testing, problem solving, and research. Build trebuchets to launch ‘missiles’, learn about solar powered cars at the Westcott Center’s Solar House, and experiment with prosthetic arms or wind turbines. Projects will increase students’ teamwork and communication skills and will involve partnerships with community organizations.  Students who applied during the previous spring may also receive College Credit Plus through the University of Cincinnati.

Criminology in Film 0.5 English 10-12 10-15 Afternoon

What makes people do extreme things? What social conditions lead to evil in the world? Why are we so obsessed with depictions of violence in our art and culture? These are the central questions of the criminology in film class. Pulling from a variety of film genres and working with a number of critical theories from psychology, sociology, criminology, and literary theory, we will examine the nature of the criminal mind and its relationship to mass media productions. In addition to several critical papers examining the films we watch in class, this course will also have a significant creative writing element in which students create works of fiction which reflect both the artistic and criminological ideas of the course.

 

The American Presidency 0.5 Social Studies 10-12 10-15 Afternoon

The class will focus on various roles and history of the American Presidency.  This course will examine not only the men who have served the role of our Nation’s leader, but also the specific responsibilities of the Presidency.  Special attention will be paid to major influences on the presidents such as first ladies, vice-presidents, rivals, and major influences on the presidents.

Major Topics Covered:  What is the office of the Presidency and why was this political system chosen by our founding fathers.  Material will be divided into four specific areas:  Early Presidents, Expansionist Presidents, Crisis Presidents, and Modern Presidents.

Internet research and primary sources will be a critical part of the course as well as final paper.

 

Independent Study/Internship 0.5 or 1.0 10- 12 No Limit Whole or Half Day

 

*In order to complete an internship as a sophomore, you must have a 3.75 cumulative GPA. There is no GPA requirement for juniors and seniors.*

Winter Term internships are designed to help you explore career options, connect to academic work, and/or pursue a deep personal interest. Students can register for full or half-day internships. Eligible sophomores, juniors, and seniors are encouraged to take this opportunity to explore career fields of interest, gaining an understanding of the demands, educational needs, and daily routine of a career. The experience will help the student narrow career choices. Students also take this time to work on comprehensive research projects. See Dr. Kregel for details. All paperwork for independent studies/internships is due Friday, November 6.

Irish Studies 1.0 Seniors Only   International Travel

The Irish Studies course is a unique offering as it combines many elements of student learning. Students cover topics that meet Archdiocesan or ODE standards in Theology, English, Economics, History, and Science. Student learning is a blend of independent study, group learning, and most prominently, learning through hands-on interaction. Independent study occurs mostly over the Christmas break and reflects the upcoming curriculum. Students engage in small group learning through this course. The most unique piece of the Irish Studies curriculum occurs when students have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the Irish history and culture that they study. Journaling is required so as to encourage reflection during the trip. Students are expected to complete a significant amount of work prior to and after the trip. A continual integration of technology is also expected. And, of course, these students travel to Ireland for ten days!

 

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